Published On: Fri, Jun 14th, 2013

New protein found to control deadly cancer metastasis

cellNew protein found to control

deadly cancer metastasis

Researchers have found a critical element that may explain why some cancers spread farther and faster than others, a discovery that could lead to one of the Holy Grails of cancer treatment: containing the disease.

Scientists from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a protein that seems to serve as a switch, regulating the spread of cancer from the primary tumor to distant spots in the body – a process known as metastasis.  The protein is used by embryo cells during early development, but then disappears from the body after an individual comes out of the womb.

According to the researchers, the protein was only found in people with metastatic cancer, leading them to belive that the regulation of this protein could potentially stop the dangerous progression of this killer disease.

“The protein seems to get turned off (after embryonic development), and we’ve only identified a small sub-population of cells that can turn it on,” lead investigator, Dr. Thomas Kipps, Evelyn and Edwin Tasch Chair in Cancer Research at UC San Diego, told FoxNews.com.  “By and large, we looked at the brain, lungs, heart, kidney and other organs, and it wasn’t there. Then we looked at a variety of cancers – breast, ovarian, prostate – and it seems to be a common theme to express this embryonic protein.”

metastasized
Kipps said they stumbled upon this protein while conducting immunotherapy research on leukemia patients, in which they reengineered the patients’ leukemia cells and injected them into their bodies.  This technique is meant to enhance the body’s natural immune response to cancer.

“We did have patients respond to their leukemia cells, but part of the immune response was a cell that targeted (this protein),” Kipps said. “Anecdotally, these patients did well. So we wanted to know (what) it is doing.”

The protein, called Receptor-tyrosine-kinase-like Orphan Receptor 1, or ROR1, is involved in a process known as epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), which occurs during early embryonic development.  Throughout the EMT process, embryonic cells migrate and eventually grow into new organs.

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Join the Nutricula Magazine Mailing List
Follow Me on Pinterest

Recent Posts

Crickets! Good Food for You & Fido

August 24, 2017, Comments Off on Crickets! Good Food for You & Fido

Historical Hemp

August 24, 2017, Comments Off on Historical Hemp

SMART WOMEN’S CHOICE- A vaginal gel that is made with safe, natural ingredients.

October 20, 2015, Comments Off on SMART WOMEN’S CHOICE- A vaginal gel that is made with safe, natural ingredients.

“Female Viagra”: Women, Just Say “NO” To Addyi

October 6, 2015, Comments Off on “Female Viagra”: Women, Just Say “NO” To Addyi

Chef Mimi’s “Cool” Recipe for the “Hot” Dog

September 15, 2015, Comments Off on Chef Mimi’s “Cool” Recipe for the “Hot” Dog

Does your Dog or Cat have Genetic problems?

September 15, 2015, Comments Off on Does your Dog or Cat have Genetic problems?

The Prime Causes of Canine Cancer

August 27, 2015, Comments Off on The Prime Causes of Canine Cancer

subscribe-image