Published On: Wed, Mar 26th, 2014

Diabetes and Probiotics

Diabetes2One hundred years ago there was no such thing as type 2 – or, what is now called ‘adult on-set’- diabetes. We first started hearing about type 2 diabetes about fifty years ago.

 There are many and complex reasons why it is common now and was not then; however, the most significant reason is the dramatic change in where our food comes from. Most produce formerly was grown in local gardens. Produce was not genetically altered to enable it be shipped all over the country and the world. Further, chickens ran over the yards and fields and ate seeds, worms and bugs. They were not given today’s kind of feed that has anti-biotics and hormones to fatten them up and to cause hens to lay more eggs. Cattle were out in fields eating on grass. Most canned goods were not bought in a grocery store but were canned in the home from fruits and vegetables grown locally.

There were few frozen, boxed or canned dinners with so many ingredients no one could count them, or pronounce them! There was not a fast food restaurant on every corner and people usually ate at home with their family. People had jobs that required physical labor.

Type 2 diabetes was labeled ‘adult onset’ but lately children as young as six have been diagnosed with this very dangerous disease. So, what can we do? We are not going to go back and live like we did hundred years ago. We work with computers, and we live in a fast paced world. If we are going to make a living, we need to keep up.

Well, one thing we can do is to buy real foods and not “foods” that were made in a chemistry lab. Buy foods that are organic or locally grown. Eat at home with the family at least a few times a week; everyday would be better. Make time to spend with the family doing some outside activities. And you and the kids need to exercise every day.

In a study done in 2006 by Rigshospitalet Denmark, at the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Denmark, it was found that insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes is associated with chronic inflammation. Numerous additional studies have also shown an association between insulin-resistance in type II diabetes and chronic low-grade inflammation.

Taking action against inflammation might increase sensitivity to insulin. Since some probiotics have anti-inflammatory properties, ingestion of certain probiotics – one being Lactobacillus Acidophilus – may increase insulin-sensitivity.

Results of new studies indicate that type-2 diabetes in humans can be associated with compositional changes in intestinal micro flora. Dr. Ohhira’s Probiotics includes Lactobacillus Acidophilus which may help with insulin sensitivity and may also help with the absorption of nutrients to the body. Dr. Ohhira’s Probiotics helps with proper and healthy immune response.

Since 70% of the immune system resides in the gut, taking Dr. Ohhira’s Probiotics daily may help with good gut health. This may in fact also help with the onset of many diseases and possibly type 2 diabetes. And eat responsibly, exercise, slow down and enjoy your life.

By Gayle Pruitt, CN

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